Little Museum of Dublin

Little Museum of Dublin ****

The Little Museum of Dublin is full of items donated by ordinary Dubliners and in a relaxed format charts the cultural and social history of Dublin in the 20th Century.

“U2: Made in Dublin”  tells the story of Ireland’s most famous band and features fan-donated musical rarities, signed albums, some great photography, a Trabant car and a Gibson Explorer. Curated by fans of the band, alongside some of Ireland’s best photographers and artists, the exhibition is a tribute to U2’s achievements and a celebration of their roots in the local music scene of the 1970s.

“Alfie Byrne – The Shaking Hand of Dublin” honours one of the most popular Dublin-born politicians of the 20th Century. Lord Mayor of Dublin a record ten times, Alfie Byrne was dubbed the “Shaking hand of Dublin” and “Alfred the Great” by the press, but Dubliners knew him simply as “Alfie.” Even today, nearly 60 years after his death, many Dubliners remember this short, dapper figure with affection.

Until now, he has never been the subject of a biography or an exhibition in his home town. However, his archive is now on permanent display in the Little Museum of Dublin. Among the exhibits are letters written to and from Alfie (including important new material relating to the Easter Rising), unseen photographs, cartoons, election materials, and two letters from men looking for Alfie’s help in finding a spouse.

The Editor’s Room is a small tribute to the famous Irish Times editor, R.M. Smylie, and to the much respected “newspaper of record”, the Irish Times. The room contains Smyllie’s desk, his portable typewriter, his desk lamp and many more bits and pieces from 150 years of newspaper history.

James Malton’s Prints of Dublin  – In the 1790s a young English draughtsman decided to create a group portrait of Dublin. James Malton’s timing was impeccable, as the second city of the British Empire was then among the most splendid in Europe. But Dublin went into a long decline after the Act of Union in 1800.

Malton died at the age of 38, and it wasn’t until many years after his death that his aqua-tint plates were coloured. Today we owe the very idea of Georgian Dublin to this remarkable artist. His work is admired by millions of people every year, yet little is known about Malton himself. This exhibition explores the life of a man whose work has become, as the Irish Times noted recently, “ubiquitous to the point of invisibility.” It is also a miniature biography of Dublin at the height of its golden age.

Women’s History of Ireland – Join Sarah Costigan every Monday and Thursday at 1.00 pm as she tells the story of Ireland’s famous female pioneers, from Mary Heath and Countess Markievicz to Maureen O’Hara and Mary Robinson.

Open Mon–Sun & Bank Holidays 9.30 am–5.00 pm (the last tour each day is at 5.00 pm).

Closed over the Christmas holiday period.

www.littlemuseum.ie

15 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2.

Phone 01 661 1000.

Adults €10; concessions.  Very popular guided tours available on the hour, every hour (at no extra charge).

Why not avail of the Green Mile walking tour of St Stephen’s Green, a new venture by the Little Museum? The Green Mile tour tells the story of a square which has been at the centre of Irish history for hundreds of years. Every year 8.1 million people walk through the park; it has long served as a backdrop for public and private drama, as well as being the setting for many great love stories. The tour begins with a short presentation at the Museum. Participants then embark on a 60-minute walk in the company of an expert local guide. The tours take place on Saturdays and Sundays at 11.00 am and are free with your entry ticket to the Little Museum. When booking your Saturday or Sunday entry ticket to the museum online, please select the Green Mile option.

Women’s History of Ireland – discover the untold story of Ireland’s influential women. Women have always played a part in Ireland’s history- but their contribution has not always been recognised. Sarah Costigan shares the fascinating role of women in Irish history. Join Sarah every Monday at 1.00 pm, as she tells the story of Ireland’s famous female pioneers, from Mary Heath and Countess Markievicz to Maureen O’Hara and Mary Robinson.